News

Not sure if you are registered to vote? Or maybe you just want to check your voting history over the years. It's quick and easy with a few simple steps.

Despite its setbacks, or perhaps because of them, organized labor has an energy level that AFL-CIO president Richard Trumka says he hasn’t seen before in his 50 years with the movement.

On May 7, while recovering from an illness, Amalgamated Transit Union (ATU) International President Larry Hanley died suddenly.  In a brief statement, his family,

Get Labor's take here on the 2019 Legislative Session and find the bill numbers your KS AFL-CIO Officers are tracking for the Labor Movement. It's the half-way point and have you made contact with your legislator? We make it easy right here to get informed and contact legislators to weigh in on Labor's issues.

The KANSAS AFL-CIO has adopted the following legislative objectives for the 2019 Kansas Legislative Session. Our platform is not limited to this agenda, but instead this represents some of our priorities of focus for a diverse workforce of affiliates. The Kansas AFL-CIO represents white collar and blue collar professionals including Machinists, Industrial Unionists, Public Employees, Teachers and Building Construction Trade Crafts.

Sponsor us, or join us for a day of fun on the golf course! The purpose of our event is to continue our mission on behalf of the hopes and aspirations of the working people of all America, but specifically for Working Kansas Families; to the achievement of higher standards of living and safe working conditions; to the attainment of security for the rights, recognition, dignity and respect to which they are justly entitled; and finally, the enjoyment of the leisure for which their skills make possible. Our event is to be held on September 14, 2019.

Federal agencies have been told to carry out Trump administration directives aimed at restricting the role of unions in the federal workplace and giving agencies the maximum discretion in taking disciplinary actions against employees, now that a court ban against many of those policies has been lifted.

A key labor leader has warned House Democrats not to expedite approval of a new North American trade deal, saying that the agreement remains far from complete and that a vote in coming weeks would be a “colossal mistake.”

It was just a decade ago that the Great Recession — the worst economic disaster since the Great Depression — upended life for hundreds of millions of Americans. More than 8 million people across the country lost their jobs. Millions more lost their homes and life savings.

The economy has made steady improvements since 2008, but recovery has disproportionately favored wealthier Americans.

One of the workshops at the Connecticut AFL-CIO’s two-day convention that opened here Thursday explored the lessons offered from “worker power resurgence,” a reference to labor’s extraordinary year of strikes and other work stoppages in 2018.

For decades, working families could depend on labor unions to represent their collective interests -- ensuring a living wage, better benefits and a voice in their workplace. Now, after 50 years of rollbacks on union and labor rights, workers have been silenced at their jobs. The Protecting the Right to Organize (PRO) Act is an opportunity for Congress to give working families their voice back.