News

KS AFL-CIO COPE CONVENTION DELEGATES MAKE ENDORSEMENTS  The KANSAS AFL-CIO has taken action this July to Endorse 2020 Candidates for Political Office.

Not sure if you are registered to vote? Or maybe you just want to check your voting history over the years. It's quick and easy with a few simple steps.

The path to the presidency runs through the labor movement.

Get Labor's take here on the 2019 Legislative Session and find the bill numbers your KS AFL-CIO Officers are tracking for the Labor Movement. It's the half-way point and have you made contact with your legislator? We make it easy right here to get informed and contact legislators to weigh in on Labor's issues.

The KANSAS AFL-CIO has adopted the following legislative objectives for the 2020 Kansas Legislative Session. Our platform is not limited to this agenda, but instead this represents some of our priorities of focus for a diverse workforce of affiliates. The Kansas AFL-CIO represents white collar and blue collar professionals including Machinists, Industrial Unionists, Public Employees, Teachers and Building Construction Trade Crafts.

Sponsor us, or join us for a day of fun on the golf course! The purpose of our event is to continue our mission on behalf of the hopes and aspirations of the working people of all America, but specifically for Working Kansas Families; to the achievement of higher standards of living and safe working conditions; to the attainment of security for the rights, recognition, dignity and respect to which they are justly entitled; and finally, the enjoyment of the leisure for which their skills make possible. Our event is to be held on September 12, 2020.

More than three years after taking office, the administration has never filled the job running the Occupational Safety and Health Administration, which is charged with enforcing workplace safety laws. The $560 million-a-year agency, whose estimated 2,000 inspectors performed 32,020 on-site inspections in 2018, spent months not doing any in-person inspections related to coronavirus, other than in hospitals, said Rebecca Reindel, director of occupational safety and health for the AFL-CIO.

Working people are bearing the brunt of this global pandemic and economic crisis. The physical toll, death, pain, and suffering that Oregon’s frontline and essential workers have experienced is unprecedented.

Coupled with the economic collapse that has exacerbated long-term inequities for low wage workers and BIPOC communities, workers are hurting and they need protections.

Daniel DiSalvo asks: “Will Unions Let Schools Reopen?” (op-ed, June 30). Of course! The AFT published our school reopening plan in April. We said it isn’t a question of whether to reopen, but how to do it safely. We need the infrastructure and investment to physically distance, stagger classes, provide personal protective equipment and test, trace and isolate new cases.

Racial disparities in who contracts the virus have played out in big cities like Milwaukee and New York, but also in smaller metropolitan areas like Grand Rapids, Mich., where the Bradleys live. Those inequities became painfully apparent when Ms. Bradley, who is Black, was wheeled through the emergency room. Early numbers had shown that Black and Latino people were being harmed by the virus at higher rates.