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Not sure if you are registered to vote? Or maybe you just want to check your voting history over the years. It's quick and easy with a few simple steps.

Patt Moon-Updike wanted to be a nurse since she was 9 years old.

On Feb. 15, just days after massive layoffs at Activision Blizzard, the AFL-CIO issued a powerful public statement of support to game developers in the United States. Its message, published in an open letter at Kotaku, was both simple and profound.

The Topeka Federation is announcing the launch of Camp FOCUS 2019. It is a one-week summer camp geared towards educating middle-schoolers about the importance of Labor in the community. The camp will provide a program to share Labor's perspective on a varity of issues including Labor History, Young Workers, Globilization, Women in Labor, Human Rights and more. The beginning date is July 15th and the camp will run through July 19th. See the attached registration form and additional information on organizational sponsorships.

Get Labor's take here on the 2019 Legislative Session and find the bill numbers your KS AFL-CIO Officers are tracking for the Labor Movement. It's the half-way point and have you made contact with your legislator? We make it easy right here to get informed and contact legislators to weigh in on Labor's issues.

The KANSAS AFL-CIO has adopted the following legislative objectives for the 2019 Kansas Legislative Session. Our platform is not limited to this agenda, but instead this represents some of our priorities of focus for a diverse workforce of affiliates. The Kansas AFL-CIO represents white collar and blue collar professionals including Machinists, Industrial Unionists, Public Employees, Teachers and Building Construction Trade Crafts.

Sponsor us, or join us for a day of fun on the golf course! The purpose of our event is to continue our mission on behalf of the hopes and aspirations of the working people of all America, but specifically for Working Kansas Families; to the achievement of higher standards of living and safe working conditions; to the attainment of security for the rights, recognition, dignity and respect to which they are justly entitled; and finally, the enjoyment of the leisure for which their skills make possible. Our event is to be held on September 14, 2019.

This week, millions of consumers flocked to Amazon looking for a deal on Prime Day, which brought in more than $3.9 billion for the retail giant last year. Maybe you were one of those shoppers.

I was raised in a company house, in a company town, where the miners had to buy their own oilers – that is, rubber coveralls – drill bits, and other tools at the company store.

That company, Inco Limited, the world’s leading producer of nickel for most of the 20th century, controlled the town of Sudbury, Ontario, but never succeeded in owning the souls of the men and women who lived and worked there.

That’s because these were union men and women: self-possessed, a little rowdy, and well aware that puny pleas from individual workers fall on deaf corporate ears.

A year after a landmark U.S. Supreme Court ruling that threatened to cripple public sector unions, they seem to be holding their own.

Government employees, it turns out, see value in belonging to unions. Membership in Illinois government unions actually has increased a year after the June 27, 2018, ruling in Janus vs. AFSCME, as Sun-Times Washington Bureau Chief Lynn Sweet reported in a recent column.

Raise a glass to the longest economic expansion in modern American history.

A full decade has passed since the end of the last recession, in June 2009, and the economy continues to grow. As of Monday, the current expansion surpassed the previous record for uninterrupted growth, set between 1991 and 2001.

But this time around, no one is accusing Americans of irrational exuberance: These good times don’t feel particularly good. Economic growth over the past decade has been slow and fragile, and most of the benefits have been claimed by a small minority of  the population.